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January 20, 2022
Jan 20, 2022
Word
esurient
adjective
Definition
hungry, greedy
Example
No one was surprised that the esurient media mogul planned to expand his empire into the social-media marketplace.
Origin
If you’re hungry for a new way to express your hunger, you might find that esurient suits your palate. Be forewarned, however, that when used literally esurient has a humorous flavor. This somewhat obscure word first appeared in English in the second half of the 17th century, deriving from the present participle of the Latin verb esurire, meaning "to be hungry." It is also related to edere, the Latin verb for "eat," which has given us such scrumptious fare as edible and its synonyms esculent and comestible. Esurient can be used somewhat playfully to suggest an actual hunger for food, but it is more often applied to such things as wealth or power. In the latter contexts, it takes on the connotation of greedy.
Webster's Dictionary
Idiom
roll the bones
Cast dice, especially in the game of craps, as in Let's go to the casino and roll the bones tonight. This slangy term was first recorded in 1897, but the noun bones has referred to dice since the late 1300s (Chaucer used it in The Pardoner's Tale).
The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms
Fun facts
  1. There are over 2,000 different species of cactuses.
  2. There are more French restaurants in New York City than in Paris.
Snapple's under-the-cap 'Real Facts'
Artist
Damien Hirst
Born Jun 7, 1965

Damien Steven Hirst is an English artist, entrepreneur, and art collector. He is one of the Young British Artists, who dominated the art scene in the UK during the 1990s. He is reportedly the United Kingdom's richest living artist, with his wealth valued at £215m in the 2010 Sunday Times Rich List. During the 1990s his career was closely linked with the collector Charles Saatchi, but increasing frictions came to a head in 2003 and the relationship ended.

Death is a central theme in Hirst's works. He became famous for a series of artworks in which dead animals are preserved—sometimes having been dissected—in formaldehyde. The best-known of these was The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living, a 14-foot tiger shark immersed in formaldehyde in a clear display case. He has also made "spin paintings", created on a spinning circular surface, and "spot paintings", which are rows of randomly coloured circles created by his assistants.

In September 2008, Hirst made an unprecedented move for a living artist by selling a complete show, Beautiful Inside My Head Forever, at Sotheby's by auction and bypassing his long-standing galleries.

Learn more »
Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historical figure
Manuel Azaña
Jan 10, 1880 - Nov 3, 1940

Manuel Azaña Díaz was a Spanish politician who served as Prime Minister of the Second Spanish Republic and the last President of the Republic.

A collaborator in several publications in the 1910s, he stood out in the pro-Allies camp during World War I. Very critical towards the Generation of '98 and not keen of the reimagination of the Spanish Middle Ages, the Imperial Spain nor the 20th yearnings for a praetorian refurbishment of the country, Azaña followed instead the examples of the French Enlightenment and the Third French Republic, and took a political quest for democracy in the 1920s while defending the notion of homeland as the "democratic equality of all citizens towards the law" that made him embrace republicanism.

After the Proclamation of the Second Spanish Republic in April 1931, Azaña became Minister of War of the Provisional Government and enacted military reform, looking to develop a modern armed forces with fewer army officers. He later became Prime Minister in October 1931.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historic event
Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.
Apr 4, 1968

Martin Luther King Jr., an American clergyman and civil rights leader, was fatally shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, at 6:01 p.m. CST. He was rushed to St. Joseph's Hospital, where he died at 7:05 p.m. He was a prominent leader of the Civil Rights Movement and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate who was known for his use of nonviolence and civil disobedience.

James Earl Ray, a fugitive from the Missouri State Penitentiary, was arrested on June 8, 1968, in London at Heathrow Airport, extradited to the United States, and charged with the crime. On March 10, 1969, he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 99 years in the Tennessee State Penitentiary. He later made many attempts to withdraw his guilty plea and be tried by a jury, but was unsuccessful; he died in prison in 1998.

The King family and others believe the assassination was the result of a conspiracy involving the U.S. government, Mafia and Memphis police, as alleged by Loyd Jowers in 1993. They believe that Ray was a scapegoat. In 1999, the family filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Jowers for the sum of $10 million.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Quote
Energy and persistence conquer all things.
Benjamin Franklin