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July 22, 2024
Jul 22, 2024
Word
satiate
verb
Definition
to satisfy (as a need or desire) fully or to excess
Example
After eating three pieces of pie and one of cake at the potluck, Jamie's sweet tooth was finally satiated.
Origin
"Satiate," "sate," "surfeit," "cloy," "pall," "glut," and "gorge" all mean to fill to repletion. "Satiate" and "sate" sometimes imply only complete satisfaction but more often suggest repletion that has destroyed interest or desire, as in "Years of globe-trotting had satiated their interest in travel" and "Readers were sated with sensationalistic stories." "Surfeit" implies a nauseating repletion, as in "They surfeited themselves with junk food," while "cloy" stresses the disgust or boredom resulting from such surfeiting, as in "The sentimental pictures cloyed after a while." "Pall" emphasizes the loss of ability to stimulate interest or appetite: "A life of leisure eventually began to pall." "Glut" implies excess in feeding or supplying, as in "a market glutted with diet books." "Gorge" suggests glutting to the point of bursting or choking, as in "They gorged themselves with chocolate."
Webster's Dictionary
Idiom
keep a civil tongue in one's head
Speak politely, as in The teacher won't allow swearing; she says we must keep a civil tongue in our heads. This expression uses tongue in the sense of "a manner of speaking," a usage dating from the 1400s. An early cautionary version was "Keep a good tongue in your head, lest it hurt your teeth" (1595).
The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms
Fun facts
  1. William Shakespeare was born and died on the same day: April 23.
  2. The coldest city in the U.S. is International Falls, Minnesota.
Snapple's under-the-cap 'Real Facts'
Artist
Pierre Puvis de Chavannes
Dec 14, 1824 - Oct 24, 1898

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes was a French painter best known for his mural painting, who came to be known as 'the painter for France'. He became the co-founder and president of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, and his work influenced many other artists, notably Robert Genin. Puvis de Chavannes was a prominent painter in the early Third Republic. Émile Zola described his work as "an art made of reason, passion, and will".

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Historical figure
Margaret Thatcher
Oct 13, 1925 - Apr 8, 2013

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, DStJ, PC, FRS, HonFRSC was a British stateswoman who served as prime minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 to 1990. She was the longest-serving British prime minister of the 20th century and the first woman to hold that office. A Soviet journalist dubbed her "The Iron Lady", a nickname that became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style. As Prime Minister, she implemented policies known as Thatcherism.

Thatcher studied chemistry at Somerville College, Oxford, and worked briefly as a research chemist, before becoming a barrister. She was elected Member of Parliament for Finchley in 1959. Edward Heath appointed her secretary of state for education and science in his 1970–74 government. In 1975, she defeated Heath in the Conservative Party leadership election to become leader of the Opposition, the first woman to lead a major political party in the United Kingdom.

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Historic event
Victorian era
Jun 20, 1837 - Jan 22, 1901

In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque era of Continental Europe. In terms of moral sensibilities and political reforms, this period began with the passage of the Reform Act 1832. There was a strong religious drive for higher moral standards led by the nonconformist churches, such as the Methodists, and the Evangelical wing of the established Church of England. Britain's relations with the other Great Powers were driven by the colonial antagonism of the Great Game with Russia, climaxing during the Crimean War; a Pax Britannica of international free trade was maintained by the country's naval and industrial supremacy. Britain embarked on global imperial expansion, particularly in Asia and Africa, which made the British Empire the largest empire in history. National self-confidence peaked.

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