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March 6, 2021
Mar 6, 2021
Word
tetralogy
noun
Definition
a series of four connected literary, artistic, or musical works
Example
The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy: A Trilogy in Four Parts (as it was published in England) is, as the name rather coyly intimates, a tetralogy of Douglas Adams novels. "Vintage has reissued Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End, a massive tetralogy of novels about England's cascading misfortunes during World War I." - From a review by Scott Eyman in Palm Beach Post (Florida), April 15, 2012
Origin
The original tetralogies were sets of four plays (three tragedies and a comedy) performed serially on the Athenian stages of ancient Greece. These sets of plays were similar to the "trilogy," a group of three serial Greek tragedies. The word "tetralogy" is from the Greek combining form "tetra-," meaning "four," joined with the combining form "-logia," which in turn comes from "logos," meaning "word." Other "tetra-" words include "tetrahedron" (a solid shape formed by four flat faces) and "tetrapod" (a vertebrate with two pairs of limbs).
Webster's Dictionary
Idiom
that ain't hay
That's a great deal, especially of money; also, that's important. For example, He's making ten thousand a month, and that ain't hay. Originally used to describe a sum of money that is large, this phrase was later extended to other circumstances, as in She married a titled lord, and that ain't hay. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms
Fun facts
  1. International tug of war rules state that the rope must be over 100-feet long.
  2. The Lollipop was named after one of the most famous Racehorses in the early 1900s, Lolly Pop.
  3. Early football fields were painted with both horizontal and vertical lines, creating a pattern that resembled a gridiron.
Snapple's under-the-cap 'Real Facts'
Artist
Frida Kahlo
Jul 6, 1907 - Jul 13, 1954

Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter known for her many portraits, self-portraits, and works inspired by the nature and artifacts of Mexico. Inspired by the country's popular culture, she employed a naïve folk art style to explore questions of identity, postcolonialism, gender, class, and race in Mexican society. Her paintings often had strong autobiographical elements and mixed realism with fantasy. In addition to belonging to the post-revolutionary Mexicayotl movement, which sought to define a Mexican identity, Kahlo has been described as a surrealist or magical realist.

Born to a German father and a mestiza mother, Kahlo spent most of her childhood and adult life at La Casa Azul, her family home in Coyoacán—now publicly accessible as the Frida Kahlo Museum. Although she was disabled by polio as a child, Kahlo had been a promising student headed for medical school until she suffered a bus accident at the age of eighteen, which caused her lifelong pain and medical problems. During her recovery she returned to her childhood hobby of art with the idea of becoming an artist.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historical figure
W. Averell Harriman
Nov 15, 1891 - Jul 26, 1986

William Averell Harriman, better known as Averell Harriman, was an American Democratic politician, businessman, and diplomat. The son of railroad baron E. H. Harriman, he served as Secretary of Commerce under President Harry S. Truman and later as the 48th Governor of New York. He was a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1952 and 1956, as well as a core member of the group of foreign policy elders known as "The Wise Men".

While attending Groton School and Yale University, he made contacts that led to creation of a banking firm that eventually merged into Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.. He owned parts of various other companies, including Union Pacific Railroad, Merchant Shipping Corporation, and Polaroid Corporation. During the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harriman served in the National Recovery Administration and on the Business Advisory Council before moving into foreign policy roles. After helping to coordinate the Lend-Lease program, Harriman served as the ambassador to the Soviet Union and attended the major World War II conferences. After the war, he became a prominent advocate of George F. Kennan's policy of containment.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historic event
Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg Address is a speech that U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered during the American Civil War at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg. It is one of the best-known speeches in American history.

Not even the day's primary speech, Lincoln's carefully crafted address came to be seen as one of the greatest and most influential statements of American national purpose. In just 271 words, beginning with the now iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago,"‍ referring to the signing of the Declaration of Independence 87 years earlier, Lincoln described the US as a nation "conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal," and represented the Civil War as a test that would determine whether such a nation, the Union sundered by the secession crisis, could endure. He extolled the sacrifices of those who died at Gettysburg in defense of those principles, and exhorted his listeners to resolve

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Quote
One’s mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions.
Oliver Wendell Holmes