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January 31, 2023
Jan 31, 2023
Word
natant
adjective
Definition
swimming or floating in water
Example
"Before me natant birds hunker against the teeth of a northerly breeze." (Kevin J. Cook, Fort Collins Coloradoan, November 29, 2002)
Origin
"Natant" and the smattering of other words birthed in the waters of Latin "natare," meaning "to swim," sound unnecessarily formal in most contexts. We could say "The natant athletes who've done their time at the local natatorium are easily distinguished by their natatorial skills; their natation is markedly better than that of those who have practiced less." Most of us, however, would prefer "The swimmers who've done their time at the local indoor swimming pool are easily distinguished by their swimming skills; their swimming is markedly better than that of those who have practiced less." The common German-derived word "swimming" suits most of us just fine. Science, though, often prefers Latin, which is why you're most likely to encounter "natare" words in scientific contexts.
Webster's Dictionary
Idiom
there's no fool like an old fool
An old fool is the worst kind of fool, as in He's marrying a woman fifty years his junior---there's no fool like an old fool. This adage, now considered somewhat offensive for stereotyping old people, appeared in John Heywood's 1546 proverb collection and has been repeated ever since.
The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms
Fun facts
  1. The raised bump reflectors on U.S. roads are named "Botts dots."
  2. Cape May is the oldest seashore resort in America.
Snapple's under-the-cap 'Real Facts'
Artist
Ludwig Richter
Sep 28, 1803 - Jun 19, 1884

Adrian Ludwig Richter, a 19th-century German painter and etcher, who was strongly influenced by Erhard and Chodowiecki.

He was the most popular, and in many ways the most typical German illustrator of the middle of the 19th century. His work is as typically German and homely as are the fairy-tales of Grimm, for whom he produced several woodcuts.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historical figure
Evans Carlson
Feb 26, 1896 - May 27, 1947

Evans Fordyce Carlson was a decorated and retired United States Marine Corps general officer who was the legendary leader of "Carlson's Raiders" during World War II. Many credit Carlson with developing the tactics and attitude that would later come to define America's special operations forces. He is renowned for the "Makin Island raid" in 1942, and his raiders' "Long Patrol" behind Japanese lines on Guadalcanal, in which 488 Japanese were killed. Carlson popularised the phrase "gung-ho".

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historic event
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the March on Washington, or The Great March on Washington, was held in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to advocate for the civil and economic rights of African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr., standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, delivered his historic "I Have a Dream" speech in which he called for an end to racism.

The march was organized by A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin, who built an alliance of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations that came together under the banner of "jobs and freedom." Estimates of the number of participants varied from 200,000 to 300,000, but the most widely cited estimate is 250,000 people. Observers estimated that 75–80% of the marchers were black. The march was one of the largest political rallies for human rights in United States history. Walter Reuther, president of the United Auto Workers, was the most integral and significant white organizer of the march.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Quote
One day or day one. You decide.
Unknown