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August 19, 2022
Aug 19, 2022
Word
augur
verb
Definition
  1. to foretell (something) or to predict the future especially from omens
  2. to give promise of : presage
Example
The state's new first-time home-buyer program augurs a healthy jump in home sales this year.
Origin
Auguring is what augurs did in ancient Rome. These were official diviners whose function it was, not to foretell the future, but to divine whether the gods approved of a proposed undertaking, such as a military move. These augurs did so by various means, among them observing the behavior of birds and examining the intestines of sacrificed animals. Nowadays, the intransitive verb sense of "foretell" is often used with an adverb, such as "well," as in our second example above. "Augur" comes from Latin and is related to the Latin verb "augēre," which means "to increase" and is the source of "augment," "auction," and "author."
Webster's Dictionary
Idiom
the exception proves the rule
An instance that does not obey a rule shows that the rule exists. For example, John's much shorter than average but excels at basketball---the exception proves the rule. This seemingly paradoxical phrase is the converse of the older idea that every rule has an exception. [Mid-1600s]
The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms
Fun facts
  1. A Pelican can hold more food in its beak than its belly.
  2. The Sahara Desert stretches farther than the distance from California to New York.
Snapple's under-the-cap 'Real Facts'
Artist
Lou Reed
Mar 2, 1942 - Oct 27, 2013

Lewis Allan Reed was an American musician, singer, songwriter and poet. He was the rhythm/lead guitarist, singer and principal songwriter for the rock band The Velvet Underground and had a solo career that spanned five decades. The Velvet Underground was not a commercial success during its existence, but became regarded as one of the most influential bands in the history of underground and alternative rock music.

After leaving the band in 1970, Reed released twenty solo studio albums. His second, Transformer, was produced by David Bowie and arranged by Mick Ronson, and brought mainstream recognition. The album is considered an influential landmark of the glam rock genre, anchored by Reed's most successful single, "Walk on the Wild Side". After Transformer, the less commercial but critically acclaimed Berlin reached No. 7 on the UK Albums Chart. Rock 'n' Roll Animal sold strongly, and Sally Can't Dance peaked at No. 10 on the Billboard 200; but for a long period after, Reed's work did not translate into sales, leading him deeper into drug addiction and alcoholism.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historical figure
Hans Mark
Born Jun 17, 1929

Hans Michael Mark is a former Secretary of the Air Force and a former Deputy Administrator of NASA. He is an expert and consultant in aerospace design and national defense policy. Mark retired from the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at the University of Texas at Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering in July 2014.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historic event
Battle of Midway
Jun 4, 1942 - Jun 7, 1942

The Battle of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II that took place on 4–7 June 1942, six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea. The United States Navy under Admirals Chester W. Nimitz, Frank J. Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chūichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondō near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare", while naval historian Craig Symonds called it "one of the most consequential naval engagements in world history, ranking alongside Salamis, Trafalgar, and Tsushima Strait, as both tactically decisive and strategically influential".

The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, hoped to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture