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September 17, 2021
Sep 17, 2021
Word
clochard
noun
Definition
tramp, vagrant
Example
"He lives on the Pont Neuf, the oldest and most beautiful bridge in Paris, which has become a secret home to clochards . . . while closed for extensive repairs." (Vincent Canby, The New York Times, October 6, 1992)
Origin
Why such a fancy French word for a bum? The truth of the matter is, nine times out of ten, you will find "clochard" used for not just any bum, but a French bum -- even more specifically, a Parisian bum. And, sometimes, it's even a certain type of Parisian bum -- a type that has been romanticized in literature and is part of the local color. Nevertheless, as "français" as this word (which comes from the French verb "clocher," meaning "to limp") may seem, its regular appearance in English sources since 1937 makes it an English word, too.
Webster's Dictionary
Idiom
who will bell the cat
Who has enough courage to do a dangerous job? For example, Someone has to tell the teacher that her own son started the fire, but who will bell the cat? This expression originated in one of Aesop's fables as retold by William Langland in Piers Ploughman (c. 1377), in which the mice decide to put a bell around the cat's neck as a warning device but then can find none among them who will actually do it.
The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms
Fun facts
  1. Googol is a number (1 followed by 100 zeros).
  2. Human eyes have over two million working parts.
Snapple's under-the-cap 'Real Facts'
Artist
Emiliano Di Cavalcanti
Sep 6, 1897 - Oct 26, 1976

Emiliano Augusto Cavalcanti de Albuquerque Melo, known as Di Cavalcanti, was a Brazilian painter who sought to produce a form of Brazilian art free of any noticeable European influences. His wife was the painter Noêmia Mourão, who would be an inspiration in his works in the later 1930s.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historical figure
Édouard Daladier
Jun 18, 1884 - Oct 10, 1970

Édouard Daladier was a French Radical-Socialist politician and the Prime Minister of France at the outbreak of World War II.

Daladier was born in Carpentras and began his political career before World War I. During the war, he fought on the Western Front and was decorated for his service. After the war, he became a leading figure in the Radical Party and Prime Minister in 1933 and 1934. Daladier was Minister of Defence from 1936 to 1940 and Prime Minister again in 1938. As head of government, he expanded the French welfare state in 1939.

Along with Neville Chamberlain, Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler, Daladier signed the Munich Agreement in 1938, giving Nazi Germany control over the Sudetenland. After Hitler's invasion of Poland in 1939, Britain and France declared war on Germany. During the Phoney War, France's failure to aid Finland against the Soviet Union's aggression in the Winter War led to Daladier's resignation on 21 March 1940 and replacement as prime minister by Paul Reynaud. Daladier remained Minister of Defence until 19 May, when Reynaud took over the portfolio personally after the French defeat at Sedan.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture
Historic event
Sinking of the RMS Lusitania

The sinking of the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania occurred on Friday, 7 May 1915 during the First World War, as Germany waged submarine warfare against the United Kingdom which had implemented a naval blockade of Germany. The ship was identified and torpedoed by the German U-boat U-20 and sank in 18 minutes, and also took on a heavy starboard list. The vessel went down 11 miles off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland, killing 1,198 and leaving 761 survivors. The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany, contributed to the American entry into World War I and became an iconic symbol in military recruiting campaigns of why the war was being fought.

Lusitania fell victim to torpedo attack relatively early in the First World War, before tactics for evading submarines were properly implemented or understood. The contemporary investigations in both the United Kingdom and the United States into the precise causes of the ship's loss were obstructed by the needs of wartime secrecy and a propaganda campaign to ensure all blame fell upon Germany.

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Wikipedia, Google Arts & Culture